When was the Ottoman mosque within the Parthenon demolished?

After the Ottoman conquest, the Parthenon was turned into a mosque in the early 1460s. On 26 September 1687, an Ottoman ammunition dump inside the building was ignited by Venetian bombardment during a siege of the Acropolis. The resulting explosion severely damaged the Parthenon and its sculptures.

Did the Ottomans destroy the Parthenon?

The siege resulted in the destruction of a large part of the Parthenon, which the Ottomans used as a gunpowder store.
Siege of the Acropolis (1687)

Date 23–29 September 1687
Location Athens
Result Surrender of the Acropolis of Athens; destruction of the Parthenon

When was the Parthenon ruined?

1687

Indeed, it did not become a ruin until 1687, when, during the bombardment of the Acropolis by Venetians fighting the Turks, a powder magazine stored in the temple exploded and destroyed the centre of the building.

Was the Parthenon used as a mosque?

The Parthenon mosque refers to one of two places of Islamic worship created successively within the Parthenon during the Ottoman occupation of Greece. The first was the mosque adapted from the Church of Our Lady of Athens, which was destroyed by a Venetian bombardment in 1687.

Why was the Parthenon partially destroyed?

On 26 September 1687 Morosini fired, one round scoring a direct hit on the powder magazine inside the Parthenon. The ensuing explosion caused the cella to collapse, blowing out the central part of the walls and bringing down much of Phidias’ frieze.

When did the Turks bomb the Parthenon?

The disaster
The Ottoman Turks thought the Parthenon was the safest place to store the most dangerous thing in the fort, gunpowder. It was a fatal error. On the night of the 26th to the 27th of September 1687, two mortar shells went through the roof and ignited the explosives stored under it.

When was the Parthenon bombed?

1687

Indeed, few cultural monuments demonstrate this more perfectly than the Athenian Parthenon, which was unceremoniously bombed in 1687 by a Venetian-led army of mercenaries hired by Poland, Venice, and the Vatican—the very Europeans whose culture it is meant to embody—to push the Ottoman Turks out of Europe.

What happened to the mosque in Parthenon?

After the Ottoman conquest, the Parthenon was turned into a mosque in the early 1460s. On 26 September 1687, an Ottoman ammunition dump inside the building was ignited by Venetian bombardment during a siege of the Acropolis. The resulting explosion severely damaged the Parthenon and its sculptures.

Is Greece rebuilding the Parthenon?

The Greek Central Archaeological Council (KAS) decided on Wednesday that a part of the Parthenon, now in ruins on the Athens Acropolis, is to be rebuilt using mostly materials which are now lying on the ground.

Who burned down the Parthenon?

On the site of the great marble temple burned by the Persians, they constructed a new one: the Parthenon we know today.

When was the Acropolis destroyed?

Another monumental temple was built towards the end of the 6th century, and yet another was begun after the Athenian victory over the Persians at Marathon in 490 B.C. However, the Acropolis was captured and destroyed by the Persians 10 years later (in 480 B.C.).

How many times was the Acropolis destroyed?

The Acropolis was besieged thrice during the Greek War of Independence (two sieges from the Greeks in 1821–1822 and one from the Ottomans in 1826–1827.

What destroyed the Parthenon?

In 1687, during the siege of the Acropolis by the troops of Venetian general Francesco Morosini a cannoball made a direct hit in the interior of the temple, which the Turks used as powder magazine. The terrible explosion blew up the roof ond destroyed the long sides of the temple as well as parts of its sculptures.

Is the Acropolis and Parthenon the same thing?

Acropolis is the area the Parthenon sits on.
The Acropolis is the high hill in Athens that the Parthenon, an old temple, sits on.

Who turned the Parthenon into a church?

In the 5th century, the Parthenon was transformed into a three-aisled Christian basilica dedicated first to Hagia Sophia and then (in the mid-Byzantine years) to Panagia Athiniotissa. During the reign of Emperor Justinian, however, it was consecrated and defined as the “Catholic Church of Athens”.